Robin Hood’s Bow and Arrows: Story Props

Bow and 3 arrowsNeed for Bow:
1 pool noodle
gray yarn -3 strands breaded together, length roughly 1 and 3/4s length of noodle, strung through pool noodle and knotted off (bow strong)
black felt (hand gripper)

Need for  Arrows:
2 straws (inside of the 2 arrow stems)
black felt (outside of the 2 arrow stems)
gray felt (arrow tip)
green felt (arrow end fringe)
orange foam (golden arrow stem)
yellow construction paper (golden arrow tip and fringe)


Participation Age Range: Kindergarten to Grade 2

Skills Utilized/Reinforced: Patience, Turn Taking

Common Core Tie-In: Folk/Fairy Tale/Legend

Possible Modifications: Add additional props to grow interest in the story.

When we did this story, the sheriff and his crew all had black top hats, because that’s what I had in my prop bin. I divided the group into basic thirds: sheriff’s men, townspeople, Robin Hood’s crew.

To add in additional characters, King Richard and Prince John made an appearance in the intro to the story and they both wore crowns made using the Ellison, Border Crown die.

I also had by felt board set up with overlapping felt circles, smaller on top of larger to make a bulls-eye target. When it came to the archery competition. I just had the various shooters hold the bow and an arrow. They made a “thrum” sound and I took the arrow and placed them at various points on the target. Because the “shooting” arrows had a straw inside they were stable enough to hold up as if shooting from a bow. Because of the felt covering, they also stuck to the felt board.

(The golden arrow was not shot from the bow but given as a prize to the archery winner- Robin Hood, of course!)

Storyleads: The version I told was a mix of Robin Hood and the Golden Arrow as retold by Cari Meister with parts added in from Howard Pyle’s The Merry Adventures of Robbin Hood.

Warning: Most kids wanted a turn holding the bow. I allowed townspeople (as they had the smallest parts) to take turns in the archery competition.

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